Sport & Uniformed Public Services

Course:
Module:  Performance Physiology for Sports Coaching
Module Code:

Contents:
Module Information
Module Purpose
Learning Outcomes
Indicative Content
Scheme of Work
Teaching & Learning Assessment Strategy
Assessment Details
Indicative References
Student / Staff Responsibilities

Module Title    Performance Physiology for Sports Coaching
Year/Level/Semester    2015-2016/ Level 5/ Semester 2
Module Leader    Mark Gibson
Module Lecturers    Mark Gibson

Purpose:

This module has been designed to allow students to develop an understanding of the physiological demands presented by exercise and sport to a sports coach. This will allow students to explore how training can be used to enhance performance in sport and the consideration that must be made when designing training programmes

Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this module students should be able to:

Knowledge and Understanding
1.Clinically review the physiological demands of specific sports
2. Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the skills required to design and evaluate a physiological training programme for an individual athlete

Cognitive and Intellectual Skills
3.Analyse, apply and interpret data from a range of sources
4.Demonstrate intellectual flexibility and openness to new ideas

Practical and Professional Skills
5. Can operate ethically within the design and delivery of a physiological training programme
6.Able to act with increasing autonomy in the design and delivery of physiological training programmes

Key Transferable Skills    7.Select and use a range of communication methods appropriate to the individual athlete during delivery of the physiological training programme

Indicative Content:

•    Metabolism during exercise – Anaerobic and Aerobic
•    Training methods and adaptations
•    Aerobic and Anaerobic training
•    Strength and Power training
•    Design and periodisation of the training programme
Scheme of Work:

1
Lecture:    Module Introduction& Needs Analysis
Outline the aims, learning outcomes and assessments for the module. Needs analysis: Review of individual sport requirements. Personal training profile: fitness attributes and critical physical performance variables of the sport/game.

Seminar:    Introduction to the assessment case study. In small groups, discuss, debate and construct a needs analysis specific to a sport of your choice

Reading    Baechle, T.R, Earle, R.W. (2008).  Essentials of Strengthand Conditioning.3rd ed.  Human Kinetics. Chapter 15
Fleck, SJ. Kraemer, WJ (2004) Designing ResistanceTraining Programs.3rd ed. Champaign, Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics. Chapter 5
Siff M.C. (2003) Supertraining 6th Ed. Denver, Colorda,
Chapter 8

2
Lecture:    Introduction to Periodisation
Theoretical basis for periodization. Principle theories: G.A.S syndrome and Fitness Fatigue. Periodisation strategies: principles of training and distinct phases of planning

Directed Study

.Read and make summary notes on the session hand out:

Turner, A (2011) The Science and Practice of Periodisation: A Brief Review. National Strength and Conditioning Association, 33 (1) February, pp. 33-45
Reading    Baechle, T.R, Earle, R.W. (2008).  Essentials of Strengthand Conditioning.3rd ed.  Human Kinetics. Chapter 19
Stone M.H. Stone M. Sands W.A. (2007) Principles andPractice of Resistance Training. Champaign, Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics. Chapter 10

3
Lecture:
Training Cycles
Training organisation at Macrocycle, Mesocycle, Microcyle and Training Unit level. Creating an outline training plan.
Periodisation strategies: Linear Programming, Intermediate and Advanced Models.

Seminar

Working in pairs or small groups to design an outline training
plan for an athlete/ sport of your choice.
Consider, and display understanding of training organisation
at Macro, Meso and Microcycle level.

Directed Study

Read and make summary notes on the session hand out:

Corcoran, G, Bird, S (2009) Preseason Strength Training for Rugby Union: The General and Specific Preparatory Phases.
National Strength and Conditioning Association. 31 (6)
pp 66-73.

Reading

Bompa, TO, Carrera M (2005) Periodisation for Sports.2nded
Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics
Stone M.H. Stone M. Sands W.A. (2007) Principles andPractice of Resistance Training. Champaign, Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics. Chapter 10

4    Lecture    Adaptability to Exercise: Strength & Power
Key terms and definitions. Muscular system and functional characteristics. Review muscle physiology. Muscle fibre hypertrophy: match adaptations to training methods
Neuromuscular system. Muscle fibre characteristics and muscle force potential.

Seminar    Small group work:

List and relate knowledge of specialized training techniques used to maximize muscle hypertrophy.

Questionnaire: Activation of Muscle Fibre Types in Sports Events

Reading

Baechle, T.R, Earle, R.W. (2008).  Essentials of Strengthand Conditioning.3rd ed.  Human Kinetics. Chapter 1
Fleck, SJ. Kraemer, WJ (2004) Designing ResistanceTraining Programs.3rd ed. Champaign, Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics. Chapters 3 and 4
Siff M.C. (2003) Supertraining 6th Ed. Denver, Colorda,
Chapter 1

5        Reading Week

6    Lecture

Adaptability to Exercise: Endurance
DefiDefining endurance capacity. Review cardiovascular physiology. Central and peripheral adaptations.
Maximum oxygen uptake. Fractional utilisation of V02 max, lactate threshold and performance.
Training specificity and intensity: LSD, MIIT and HIIT adaptations
Directed
Study

Read and make summary notes on the session hand out:

Iaia, FM. Rampinini, E. Bangsbo, J (2009) High- IntensityTraining in Football. International Journal of SportsPhysiology and Performance. 4, pp 291-305

Reading    McArdle WD, Katch FI and Katch VL (2001).  ExercisePhysiology: Energy Nutrition and Human Performance. 5th ed., Lippincott, Williams and Williams, Philadelphia.
Reilly, T (2006) The Science of Training, Routledge
Wilmore JH and Costill DL (2004).  Physiology of Sport andExercise.  3rd ed., Human Kinetics, Campaign.
Winter, E et al (eds) (2006) Sport and Exercise PhysiologyTesting Guidelines. Routledge
H

7    Lecture
Principles of Athletic Assessment
Fitness testing to assess athletic development. Rationale for testing. Test quality: validity and reliability issues.
Test selection: sports specificity, athlete experience and training status
Preparing athletes for testing, health & safety and test order.

Seminar    Practical to exemplify test quality using the sport hall. Selected sport specific training drills including: Single-Hoop Agility, Four Corner Agility, Depth Jumps, Sprint/Sprint Fatigue

Reading    le W,  Eston, T. and Reilly, T. (2002) Kinanthropometry and Exercise Physiology Laboratory Manual: Tests, Procedures and Data 2nd ed., Routledge
Gore, C.J. (2000).  Physiological tests for elite athletes. Australian Sports Commission; Champaign, IL : Human Kinetics.
Winter, E et al (eds) (2006) Sport and Exercise PhysiologyTesting Guidelines. Routledge

8

Lecture    Inter Component Compatibility: Strength, Power & Endurance.
Review training adaptations. Concurrent exercise routines and the ‘interference phenomenon’. Research findings: implications for exercise and planning to incorporate both training methods.
Seminar

Continued practice to exemplify test quality using the sport hall. Selected sport specific training drills including: Single-Hoop Agility, Four Corner Agility, Depth Jumps, Sprint/Sprint Fatigue
Reading    Docherty, D, Sporer, B (2000)A Proposed Model for Examining the Interference Phenomenon between Concurrent Aerobic and Strength Training. Sports Medicine.
30 (6) December, pp 385-394
Stone M.H. Stone M. Sands W.A. (2007) Principles and Practice of Resistance Training. Champaign, Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics. Chapter 10

9    Lecture

Inter Component Compatibility: Strength and Flexibility
Defining flexibility. Factors affecting flexibility. Effects of acute and chronic stretching on exercise performance. Functional flexibility: PNF stretching and Vibration methods.
Interference Phenomenon: how to incorporate both strength and flexibility concurrently.

Reading    Foran, B. (2001) High Performance Sports Conditioning Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics
Gore, C.J. (2000).  Physiological tests for elite athletes. Australian Sports Commission; Champaign, IL : Human Kinetics.
Magnusson, P. Renstrom, P (2006) The European College of Sports Sciences Position Statement: The Role of Stretching Exercises in Sports. European Journal of Sport Science. 6 (2) June, pp 87-91

10
Lecture

Athlete Monitoring & Evaluation
Purpose of monitoring and evaluation.
Strengths and weaknesses of different modes of monitoring and evaluation.
Overtraining Syndrome (OTS) and Overreaching Syndrome (ORS): diagnosis and hypothetical mechanisms.
Athlete Management.

Seminar    Monitoring and Evaluation Questionnaires. Using sample
questionnaires to evaluate your lifestyle, training stress
and recovery

Reading    Jeffreys, I. (2004) A System for Monitoring Training Stress and Recovery in High School Athletes. Strength andConditioning Journal. 26 (3) June, pp 28-33
Siff M.C. (2003) Supertraining 6th Ed. Denver, Colorda,
Chapter 1
Stone M.H. Stone M. Sands W.A. (2007) Principles and Practice of Resistance Training. Champaign, Illinois, USA, Human Kinetics. Chapter 9

11    Lecture

Pre-Conditioning and Prehabilitation
Definition of terms and rationale
Intrinsic and Extrinsic injury risk factors

Seminar

Guest Speaker (TBC)
Reading    Baechle, T.R, Earle, R.W. (2008).  Essentials of Strengthand Conditioning.3rd ed.  Human Kinetics. Chapter 20

12

Assessment Review:
Case Study Report& Presentations
Student support and guidance: Theory of how to write the case study report and expectations for the presentation.

13
Presentations

14         Presentations

Hand In Report

15

Marking & Standardisation

Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy:

Formal lectures, tutorials and related practical work will be engaged throughout. Lectures will provide explanation of principles and discussion of applications. Practicals will involve the use of Sports Laboratories to explore the physiology of human performance. Tutorials will involve guided exercises and practical tasks incorporating examples of current industry practice.

The assessment will consist of:

Part 1: Presentation (50%): 10 minutes plus 5 minutes for questions

Students willdeliver an individual presentation that justifies the testing battery for a selected case study who is actively involved in sports (the case study might be either a member of the group or an athlete who will agree to be tested).

Assessment Criteria

Rationale and justification of the test battery: Primary needs analysis specific to the person being tested.

30%

Identification and analysis of the fitness components relevant to the sport

20%

Reference to the assessment package, validity and reliability of selected tests and  relate contemporary criterion test measures

20%

Safety and ethical issues covered

10%

Ability to communicate in a clear and concise way and present the assessment in a structured manner and in the appropriate format using formal academic styles(appropriate headings, spelling, grammar, word processing). Visual and verbal impact.
10%

Referencing: Ability to use an appropriate level of Harvard referencing for written academic work and the inclusion of a suitable reference list with a range of references from a variety of appropriate sources    10%

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